In fact, mitigating nutritional deficiencies is where supplements “are best utilized” according to Craig Hopp, deputy director of the division of extramural research at the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, part of the US National Institutes of Health.

“Anytime somebody is missing major food groups, the first question is, can we target the missing nutrients with food? If not, then we would look into a supplement,” said registered dietitian nutritionist Melissa Majumdar, who is a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

But there’s a big difference between taking a pill as “nutritional insurance” if your diet is low in one or more nutrients versus taking it in the hopes of warding off disease. And even if you’re popping a pill to simply up your vitamin C or calcium intake, health professionals agree it’s not a substitute for a healthy diet.

“Eating a healthy diet is going to do far more for you than any supplement you can take, and yet we have a whole industry that is based on selling us all types of supplements,” said Martha H. Stipanuk, James Jamison professor of nutrition emeritus in the division of nutritional sciences at Cornell University.

“When we look at health outcomes, no one supplement will have the effect of an overall healthy diet, in terms of immunity or chronic disease.”


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