500,000 global deaths are reported as the world’s case total reaches 10 million.

The global total of deaths passed 500,000 on Sunday, according to a New York Times database, while the number of confirmed cases surpassed 10 million.

The grim markers were hit as countries around the world struggle to keep new infections from reaching runaway levels while simultaneously trying to emerge from painful lockdowns.

In April, roughly a month after the World Health Organization declared the outbreak a pandemic, deaths topped 100,000. In early May, the figure climbed to 250,000. Now it has doubled in less than two months.

More than a quarter of all known deaths have been in the United States.

The number of confirmed infections — which took about 40 days to double — may be substantially underestimated, public health officials say. Data released last week by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention indicated that the actual figures in many regions are probably 10 times as high as reported.

The C.D.C. criteria for each stage of reopening from a lockdown include a requirement that positivity rates decline for 14 days. According to Johns Hopkins, only 12 states reported lower average positivity rates last week than the week before.

The criteria also call for widespread availability of testing, but in hot-spot states like Arizona, Florida and Texas, many people have had a hard time getting tested, with long lines and crowding that raises tensions and the risk of infection.

“Pushing, yelling, ZERO social distancing enforced,” one Houston resident wrote on Twitter. Two testing sites at Houston stadiums reached capacity and had to turn people away just a few hours after opening on Saturday, according to the local health department.

In Florida, the first car was on line at 12:30 a.m. Saturday at the Orange County Convention Center in Orlando, according to the Florida Association of Public Information Officers, even though testing did not start there until 9 a.m. At a site in Jacksonville, the testing line was cut off in the early afternoon, before closing time, the association said on Twitter.

Lines of cars at drive-up sites in Phoenix stretched up to three miles, and the state’s largest laboratory received twice as many samples on Friday as it could process.

Coronavirus cases nationwide have risen 65 percent over the past two weeks. More than 37,800 new cases of the coronavirus were announced across the United States on Sunday, the country’s fourth-highest daily total of the pandemic.

Houston’s top official has isolated herself after being exposed to the virus.

Two governors who have had sometimes testy relationships with the White House during the pandemic expressed harsh reactions to the administration’s insistence on deferring to local governments rather than offering strong national policies to contain the virus at a time when outbreaks are escalating in a number of states.

Vice President Mike Pence strongly defended the approach on the CBS show “Face the Nation,” while attributing the rise in cases to increased testing and irresponsible behavior by young people.

“One of the elements of the genius of America is the principle of federalism, of state and local control,” Mr. Pence said. “We’ve made it clear that we want to defer to governors. We want to defer to local officials and people should listen to them.”

Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo characterized that approach as negligent on the NBC program “Meet the Press.” “They’re basically in denial about the problem,” he said. “They don’t want to tell the American people the truth. And they don’t want to have any federal response, except supporting the states.”

Mr. Cuomo said that New York, once a global epicenter, had reported five deaths on Sunday, the lowest number since the start of the pandemic. But he said that he was afraid that travelers from states with higher infection rates could reverse his state’s hard-won gains.

Gov. Jay Inslee of Washington expressed frustration at the president’s unwillingness to wear masks or to do more to encourage his supporters to wear them. “Instead of tweeting the other day about the importance of masks, he tweeted about monuments,” he said on “Face the Nation.” “We need a president who will care more about living Americans and less about dead confederates.”

Many times, restaurant outbreaks are contained to a handful of known cases. But in recent weeks, they have also been the sites of more widespread infections. At least 100 cases were tied to the Tigerland nightlife district in Baton Rouge, La.

In Michigan, where dozens of the people infected at Harper’s Restaurant were between the ages of 18 and 23, officials urged others who visited the business to isolate themselves.

“There are likely more people infected with Covid-19 not yet identified,” Linda S. Vail, the Ingham County health officer, said in a statement. “We need help from people who went to Harper’s during the exposure dates so that we can contain the outbreak. We need everyone exposed to stay home.”

In California on Sunday, the state ordered bars to close in some cities, among them Los Angeles and Fresno, and recommended that they close in others, including Sacramento, Contra Costa and Santa Barbara.

The rapid identification of restaurant clusters contrasts with the continuing uncertainty about infections stemming from protests against racially biased policing, which have been held in more than 2,000 U.S. cities since the death of George Floyd in police custody on May 25. The Times has reached out to dozens of cities that have had large protests, finding some small case groupings but no major clusters.

Thus far, the effort has found about 50 infections connected to protests, including members of the National Guard in Nebraska, Minnesota and Washington, D.C.

Buyer beware: Mask exemption cards listed for sale online are fake.

Cards for sale that claim to exempt people from wearing masks during the coronavirus pandemic are fraudulent, federal officials said.

The cards — featuring a red, white and blue eagle logo and approximately the size of a business card — say the bearer is exempt from ordinances requiring them to wear masks in public.

“Wearing a face mask posses a mental and/or physical risk to me. Under the Americans with Disability Act (ADA), I am not required to disclose my condition to you,” reads the card, which misspells “poses” and incorrectly names the Americans with Disabilities Act.

There’s also a warning that businesses or organizations can be reported to the Freedom to Breathe Agency, the group behind the cards. One version of the cards featured the Justice Department’s logo and listed a legitimate phone number where complaints about violations of the Americans with Disabilities Act can be submitted.

The cards were being sold online in boxes of at least 500 for $49.99.

The cards were created in response to complaints, the group selling them said in an email, and as “an educational tool” to help people “understand their legal and human rights so they can stand up to the unlawful, unscientific and unconstitutional mandates.”

The founder of the Freedom to Breathe Agency, Lenka Koloma, advertised the cards on her Facebook page, and they were sold on a site created through the commerce platform Shopify. The site was unavailable on Sunday afternoon.

The original Facebook group and a website on the Wix platform for the Freedom to Breathe Agency were also taken down.




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